God will make up for it?

Saying “In the end, God will make up for it” is nothing more than a cheap and dirty way of not wanting to take responsibility for the consequences of your actions.

“God will get you a spouse in the afterlife” means that you don’t have to figure out how your religion acknowledges single adults.

“God will give you children in the next life” means that you don’t have to figure out how your religion copes with infertility.

“They can accept the Gospel in the next life” means that you don’t have to figure out how to persuade others to come unto Christ, because the spirit missionaries will knock on their spirit door anyway.

I believe that God will make up for things, but I also believe it is evil to use that as an excuse to hurt others, whether that hurt comes consciously or not.

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Limiting God

A couple of weeks ago, I had an interesting conversation with a man named Jonathan. We got talking about religion, and I proclaimed myself a believer of the Book of Mormon. He was happy for me, but proceeded to say that all we need is the Bible, and quoted Revelation 22:18:

… If any man shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book:

To him, this was proof that all we need is this Bible, because no one can “add” unto “this book”, and he interpreted “this book” to mean “the Bible”.

(Never mind the fact that the Bible didn’t exist until a couple hundred of years after that was written, but whatever.)

But this got me thinking. In our conversation, we had talked about how true religion was the love of God, and that all religions are trying to experience that love. People tend to leave those religions when they realize that the love of God is larger than the limitations imposed on it by their church. The God they believe in is “too big” to fit in the box their church prescribes.

I absolutely believe this. But after we ended our amicable conversation, a thought struck me:

We had just talked about the infinite love of God, and how God places no limitations on that love. If we accept that premise as true, then wouldn’t it follow that the manifestations of His Love are also infinite? Why then would we limit ourselves to only experiencing His Love by means of a single compilation of books?

To take this even further, why are we saddened when our friends, family, and colleagues decide to leave their church? If they truly believe that they have found another (and perhaps for them, better) way to experience God’s love, ought we not to rejoice with them?

Why do we place limitations on what God can and cannot do? He is an infinite being. Is it not conceivable that He might know what’s better for us than we do? We should trust in Him, and not in the short-sighted policies of man.